Page 137

July 10, 2017

get to the point, Mr. Ondila

Sorry about the missed update last week, was having some back pain again and I’m trying not to let it become a huge thing like it did last time, as some longer-term readers might recall. In lighter news, work is starting on the book soon! Aaaaa!

12 Comments

Diplomats have a hard enough time being taken for spies when they *are* acting officially… never mind when they’re skulking around to no good purpose!

I’m loving Sam’s “totally had enough of this shit” attitude…

. . .

Sorry to hear about your back, Rose. Hope it is properly better, and take whatever rest is necessary.

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She’s had a very stressful few days! And cheers about my back, I think I pulled a muscle or something doing work around the flat. Such is life.

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I love everything about this … except that it should be “whom you are not here on behalf of”. Our good captain seems as though she’d know the difference between “who” and “whom”. She just does.

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Oh, you’re right! I had to get my editor friend to double check, but you’re definitely right. Normally my grammar and spelling are ok, but this one got past me. Your characterisation of the captain as someone who would know the difference is pretty spot on too, so I’ll change this as soon as I get a chance.

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While your at it, ask that editor why they made Samara end her sentence with a preposition. To think that our keen-minded and well-spoken Captain would make such a faux-pas is preposterous! I mean, it’s normal for us plebes to make that error, and it certainly has become more commonplace since I was a kid in school, but Samara is neither common nor lazy.

I expect I’ll be banned for “Grammar Nazism” by this time tomorrow, but I…just…couldn’t…resist…the…grammar train! :D

P.S. Saiamar seems appropriately sedate for the moment. I suspect that the Captain, despite her frustration, has made a favorable impression upon him. Do you think he’ll defect from his country full of bureaucrats, to whom he cannot seem to get his point across, or is he still too stubborn to give up?

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I doubt Siamar would be inclined to defect to join the “side” that murdered his *wife*. Even if he weren’t an upstanding citizen broadly interested in the good of his country – which is something I’ve generally assumed about him.

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Grammatik macht frei ^_°

Looking Forward to how this conversation is going to develop. Seems like some unlikely alliances are going to be made.

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That’s not an error–it’s an ironic locution–”in behalf of” is being treated as one word, an indivisible lump of bureaucratic jargon. I think it works wonderfully well.

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Thank you Kyethn, and I hate to be even more pedantic than I normally am, but Thracecius cites a rule that applies ancient Greek, or even Latin (which British public [read private if you're from the New World] schoolboys knew as a matter of course), but NOT to English, because as Tindros demonstrated by quoting Churchill (“That is something up with which I shall not put.”), ending a sentence with a preposition in English is often weird, but is almost always quite clear.
awhorl’s lovely phrase, “an indivisible lump of bureaucratic jargon”, is something I shall shamelessly rip off and modify slightly by using the word “bolus”.

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So sad to have reached the end of the archive! It’s amazing that you’re offering this spectacular work of art online for free — thank you. I’ve also been taking your recommendations from the links page, and noticed that you didn’t have Unsounded. You should check that one out; seems right up your alley.

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Thanks, SF! It’s always nice to hear from new readers. I’m actually surprised I don’t have Unsounded in my links page as well – I thought it was already in there. It’s one I enjoy myself and would definitely recommend to my readers! I’ll be adding it shortly.

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